Residency Art Gallery | Model Migration
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Group Show /// Alvaro Naddeo, Chris Gonzales, Oscar Magallanes and Sheena Rose

7.23 – 9.16.16

About the Exhibit

Model Migration features work from first-generation Latino American and Caribbean American artists. The show is an examination of the different models of migration. It will serve as commentary on how each artist coped with preserving their native heritage while adapting to U.S. culture and maintaining their creativity. The works featured in Model Migration – including sculpture, painting, photography, and video art – will offer a glimpse into each artist’s story of migration.

About the Artists

Alvaro Naddeo – Originally from São Paulo, Brazil, Naddeo is no stranger to migration, having also lived in Lima, New York City, and Los Angeles. Taking residence in these urban environments has shaped his memory and permeates most of his work. As a child, Naddeo was partly homeschooled and spent many hours watching his father, an illustrator, draw and create. This pushed Naddeo to become a self-taught artist. Along with the inspiration and encouragement he received from his father, he also found himself comparing his work to his father’s, worried his drawings and paintings were not good enough. This brief crisis of confidence forced Naddeo to take another direction with his work and pursue a career in advertising as an Art Director. This role allowed him to exercise his interest in art, but did not require a mastery of pencil or brush. Twenty years later while living in New York City, Naddeo became invigorated in the arts once more after being exposed to its many contrasts, and his desire to pick up the brushes intensified with no signs of slowing down.

Chris Gonzales – Gonzales is a first generation Belizean-American photographer born and raised in Los Angeles. In the mid-70s, both of his parents emigrated from Belize to South Los Angeles with hopes of raising a family with better economic opportunities.  Beginning at the age of six, Chris traveled to Belize at least twice a year and slowly fell in love with the country. However, upon each return home, he struggled with merging both cultures. It wasn’t until middle school when he learned to no longer be ashamed of his heritage and found his true identity and the artist inside. A photographer for most of his life, he has dedicated the past five years to working alongside some of the best photographers in the industry, building a professional portfolio focusing on Sports Advertising and Lifestyle.

Oscar Magallanes – Magallanes was raised in the Azusa Barrio of Los Angeles. His artwork is influenced by the cultural and social elements of his upbringing. At the age of fifteen, he was expelled from high school, but was accepted into the Ryman Arts program at the Otis-Parsons College campus, which encouraged him to become a professional artist. The experience of participating in two distinct worlds continues to inform the work. Magallanes’ work often touches down at the intersections of cultural iconography, the folkloric and the aesthetics of propaganda. While the execution of the work ask the viewer if the work is a call to action, nostalgic, tinged in irony or perhaps all it serves to explore the slippage that occurs between idealism reactionary movements as to ultimately work in the space of “elsewhere” rather than “the other”.

Sheena Rose – Sheena Rose is a contemporary Caribbean artist from Barbados. In 2008, Rose graduated with honors from Barbados Community College, earning a Bachelor Degree in Fine Arts. In 2014, Rose was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to study at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she received an MFA in Studio Arts. Rose is known for her hand drawn animations “Town”; and her collaborative project “Sweet Gossip,” and has been featured in numerous publications such as Huffington Post and ARC Magazine.

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